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Bath

Bath is located in the south-west of England in Somerset. It was created in 1295.

The current member of parliament is the Liberal Democrat Don Foster, who has served since 1992.

2010 General Election Results (Adjusted for non-voters)
Bath

For more information, click here to visit the Wikipedia article.

Candidates

Ollie Middleton

1. What do you plan to do in order to make sure you remain ‘in touch’ with the electorate?
At a time when many feel disconnected from politicians, it’s vital that MPs keep in touch with those they represent. I would hold ‘surgeries’ on a weekly basis and I will guarantee that my activity within the constituency would not just be confined to the election period. Social media is also something I regularly use to engage with voters. If elected I will continue to use twitter and Facebook to talk to constituents.
2. What makes you the best candidate for this constituency?
I have grown up in the constituency; Bath is my home. This gives me a personal insight into issues facing local residents. I am passionate about Bath, which is why I want the chance to represent it in parliament. I feel Bath is ready for change: people in the city have been deeply affected by damaging coalition policies and, for too long, they have been left without a voice. Bath is seen by many as a very affluent city but this is far from being the whole picture. Huge inequality exists here and as a result one in five children live in poverty. I believe this can be addressed only by electing a Labour MP and a Labour government, as only Labour has put tackling inequality at the heart of its election pledges.
3. What has the current Member achieved that you believe has been successful?
The current member, Don Foster, has held the seat for 23 years, and is now standing down. Irrespective of party, he deserves credit for having held the seat for so long. However, as a result of his personal decisions, and the decisions taken by the government he is part of, many people in Bath have been let down. He has supported the damaging Health and Social Care Act, the Bedroom Tax, the trebling of tuition fees and many more damaging Tory policies.
4. In your opinion, is austerity working? What should we take from the state of the economy during this Government’s tenure?
No. The current government’s economic policies have failed to deliver for ordinary people in Bath and up and down the country. Austerity has decimated our public services and, initially, plunged a growing economy back into recession and lost our triple-A credit rating. Statistically the economy is growing again, but we need to ensure it is a recovery for everyone, not just for a few at the top. That can only happen under a Labour government.
5. Does (legal) immigration need more limitations or is it vital for the UK?
Immigration has been a great thing for this country. The vast majority of immigrants come here to work and contribute, and many, of course, are working within public services such as the NHS. Culturally, immigration has enhanced our society, I am proud that Britain is such a diverse nation. Immigration has been a good thing for our economy too, with immigrants making a net contribution. This is something that must continue. However, we must also ensure that immigration works for all. That is why Labour has promised to crack down on employers who exploit immigrant workers at the expense of local people. We will also increase the number of border staff and ensure those working in public services can speak English fluently.
6. Many people are concerned about the cost of living in the UK, with wages having failed to rise in line with the price of food, energy and rent in recent years. How can this be corrected?
The cost-of-living crisis is a symptom of an economy that only works for a few at the top. Labour will increase the minimum wage to £8 per hour, restore the 10p starting rate of tax, freeze energy bills and guarantee 25 hours of free childcare per week for working parents of children aged three and four.
7. How would you like to see the NHS change in the future in order to become more successful?
At a time when the NHS budget should be increasing, it has been cut in real terms. Furthermore, this government has wasted £3 billion on a topdown reorganisation they said would not happen. In turn we have seen the NHS under immense pressure, and potentially limitless privatisation as a result of the damaging Health and Social Care Act. Labour will repeal the Health and Social Care Act and invest £2.5 billion a year in the NHS (funded by a tax on homes worth over £2 million, cracking down on tax avoidance and implementing a levy on tobacco companies). This will guarantee 20,000 more nurses, 8,000 more GPs, 5,000 more care workers and 3,000 more midwives. We will also guarantee a GP appointment within 48 hours and cancer tests and results within a week.
8. What measures do you think need to be taken to decrease unemployment, particularly youth unemployment and those who have never been employed?
Youth unemployment stands at almost 1 million under the Tories and Lib Dems. Our young people are our future. By failing them, this government is failing the UK. Labour will guarantee a job for every young person who has been unemployed for over a year. This will be paid for by a tax on bankers’ bonuses. We will also make sure we equip young people with the skills they need to succeed. We will provide high-skilled, properly paid apprenticeships for school leavers. This will partly be provided by ensuring that firms who run government contracts create apprenticeships in exchange.
9. Does the lack of diversity in Parliament equate to a lack of representation?
I believe parliament should be a cross section of society. That is the only way we can achieve a common consensus and a form of politics that works for all. We still have a long way to go in order to achieve this.
10 . If an EU Referendum were to take place, how would you encourage your constituents to vote and why?
It’s vital Britain remains in the EU and this is why I would encourage constituents to vote against Britain leaving Europe. Our membership of the EU has been hugely beneficial to us. If we were to walk away, we would put millions of jobs at risk – that’s jobs in the Southwest, including Bath.

Ben Howlett

1. What do you plan to do in order to make sure you remain ‘in touch’ with the electorate?
I have knocked on thousands of doors, and I am out meeting with residents every day talking about the issues that matter to them. I am taking up a heavy amount of casework due to the local Lib Dem-run Council’s cuts to the Citizen’s Advice Bureau and the fact the sitting MP is standing down. I try to help as much as possible. Local residents feel there is a huge disconnect between them and the Westminster bubble. As I was selected in an open primary I have tried to address this by making local issues my main priority.
2. What makes you the best candidate for this constituency?
Unlike my opponents I was selected in an Open Primary by Bath residents and I have been campaigning on local issues, from transport to the lack of affordable housing in the city. I relate to normal people in Bath who have a history of not being party political and are far more pragmatic. Growing up in a household where my mum is disabled and working alongside the NHS for 6 years has opened my eyes to the great need for reform of our public services. I am the best candidate for Bath because I understand that too many elephants in the room have been avoided for far too long due to party politics. I want to get things done and to reform the system, whether that is the NHS or transport.
3. What has the current Member achieved that you believe has been successful?
Don Foster, the sitting MP is standing down at the next election. I like Don a lot, he has been an strong advocate for Bath and has done a lot to help residents.
4. In your opinion, is austerity working? What should we take from the state of the economy during this Government’s tenure?
The economy has certainly turned a corner. Plan A is working. However, this is no time to turn away from the plan that the Chancellor laid out in 2010. Growth is strong, more people are in work than ever before and real wages are beginning to outstrip inflation for the first time since the 2008 crash. Youth unemployment has been a fundamental problem for successive Conservative, Labour and Coalition Governments and it will take longer than a 5 year Parliament to resolve. We need to encourage our young people to take up a skill so that we can help build Britain PLC and sell our goods to the rest of the world.
5. Does (legal) immigration need more limitations or is it vital for the UK?
We should know who is in or out of our country at any one time. However, I do not sit on the extremes of the argument. I know from my time with the NHS that we need skilled migrants coming from overseas to fill the vacancies until we can train more of our young people in to jobs like medicine for example. We also have to address the fact that a lot of British workers are not happy to work in unskilled roles. Businesses need labour, it’s an economic fact. If they do not have it, they cannot grow. Government cannot therefore collect enough taxes to pay for our public services and pensions and then we face a problem. The economic argument is easier to make than the social one of course and Labour’s policies over transitional controls in the 2000s did not help this problem.
6. Many people are concerned with the cost of living in the UK, with wages having failed to rise in line with the price of food, energy and rent in recent years. How can this be corrected?
I am too. I believe the best way to help people with the cost of living is to make everyone wealthier. That means helping people into work, it means reducing taxes for those who are poorest in society. It means building more houses and it means increased competition among businesses to drive down prices. Some of these things have been helped recently, but we must go further and that is why I am a total advocate of long-term strategy in all these areas. When I have children they could suffer due to successive generations’ lack of leadership on a range of issues. Call me an idealist, but I want to change that mindset.
7. How would you like to see the NHS change in the future in order to become more successful?
I am not sure if I have enough words to answer this quickly; it is the biggest elephant in the room of any government. Put simply, the NHS faces a huge crisis over the next decade. With an aging population that have more chronic diseases, with ever increasing costs of drugs and greater demand from patients as they look more to acute than primary care, drastic reform is needed. There are two options on this issue, either taxes will have to go up, or we will need to find money from other sources. The debate ought to be had sooner rather than later. I fear that my children’s generation will not have the same quality of care that my mum has received through her life due to a lack of political leadership. I do not believe a patient cares too much about who provides their hip replacement as long as the quality of care is high and the value for money is maximised. This is a simple argument to make, so let’s get on with it.
8. What measures do you think need to be taken to decrease unemployment, particularly youth unemployment and those who have never been employed?
I touched on this issue earlier. This is a long-term issue that requires a long term answer. I would suggest that one of the core reasons why youth unemployment has gone up is because of the decade’s long stigma attached to vocational education. I want to be clear, people who take up apprenticeships and a skill (whatever that may be) make Britain Great. One of the biggest failures of Thatcherism and New Labour was that when people aspired to be middle class they sent their children to university and would shout that they had achieved ‘middle class status’ by gaining a degree certificate. The challenge for our generation is to shout about how great you are to gain a vocational qualification, helping Britain grow.
9. Does the lack of diversity in Parliament equate to a lack of representation?
No, not necessarily. I think the majority of MPs do a good job to represent their constituencies. However, the left seem to want to denigrate the authority of MPs by forcing things like ‘all women shortlists’ or an ethnic minority candidate for a seat where there is a large ethnic minority population. This has the potential to make a large number of MPs and candidates second class as a result. I want to challenge this disgraceful shift towards positive discrimination with my positive belief in localism. I don’t think residents care too much about the colour of their MP’s skin or their sexuality but want to know if they are going to be the best representative for them in Parliament. I want to see more MPs selected by Open Primary, allowing local people to decide the best person for the job.
10 . If an EU Referendum were to take place, how would you encourage your constituents to vote and why?
I want to see the terms of our renegotiation set out before I make my decision. I think a period of marriage counselling between Britain and the EU is healthy. Like the majority, if Britain does not get a good enough deal I would vote to leave. If we get a good deal, in the interests of Britain and my constituents, I will vote to stay in a reformed relationship.

Dominic Tristram

Background
I am the Green Party prospective parliamentary candidate for Bath. I have lived and worked in Bath for fifteen years since arriving here for work after university. I was lucky enough to be offered a number of jobs in different cities and chose Bath because I immediately loved it. I’ve changed jobs and homes a few times since but remain based in Bath.

I live in Odd Down, which is on the southern edge of Bath, with my partner, who works for the NHS, and my young daughter who was born at home in Odd Down in 2012.

I work in the technology sector. I studied computer science at university and came to Bath to work for a rapidly growing start-up. Since then I’ve worked in everything from Bath’s largest IT company to some of its smallest, and my work has taken me around the world and around the country. I’ve been very lucky, and I’ve also learned a lot about how the country works. I’ve worked directly with various organisations including national and local NHS bodies, the Home Office, the Cabinet Office, Highways Agency, Environment Agency and police agencies. Working directly with these organisations means that I have actual experience of the various issues they face – something that is rare in many of today’s ‘professional politicians’ or single issue parties.

I have a long-standing interest in politics which has only grown over time. I believe that most political parties have forgotten about what really matters – the ordinary people, the world we live in, and the quality of our lives. I have been a member of various NGOs for years and attended many protests, but the voice of the people is largely ignored by most politicians today. One can simply complain about this or do something about it, so I decided that being elected was the best way to give people a voice and protect what we care about.

I am appalled at what the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats are doing to our NHS. It has just been confirmed again that the NHS is the best healthcare system in the world, yet this government has spent billions privatising it and handing huge chunks of it to their donors in private healthcare. Since the Health and Social Care Act passed in 2012 more than 70% of NHS contracts have gone to the private sector, against the wishes of the electorate and despite David Cameron promising ‘no top down reorganisation’ before the last general election. If nothing changes there will be no NHS left by 2020, and this is deeply saddening.

However, I will not let it go without a fight. In November 2012 I was elected as a Governor of the Royal United Hospital in Bath, making the Greens the only party represented (the other governors are independents). I promised to fight any and all privatisation. I will do the same in the Commons. Universal, free healthcare, run as a service and not for profit, is not just fundamental to my beliefs but demonstrably the most efficient system. We must not let the profiteers take it from us.

As well as the NHS, other rights and institutions that have been fought for and hard-won by years of progressive politics are being eroded or destroyed. The poor and vulnerable are demonised, state help is being massively reduced, and millions are having to go to food banks simply to eat. At the same time, the wealthiest have seen that wealth vastly increase and their taxes reduced. Those losing out are then being set against those who have even less. This is entirely unjust, unfair and immoral.

The world starts at your front door. Fundamentally I believe that it is important that the people of Bath are represented by someone who lives and works in their city, understands their issues and concerns, and is in fact one of them. People are becoming disillusioned with politics and it’s not hard to see why – we see professional politicians flown-in to cities to fight elections as they work their way up some sort of politics career ladder. I can assure you that is the furthest thing from my mind. I am a conviction politician – I want to do what is best for you – not what a party whip tells me to, and not what a rich donor commands.

I am standing for the Green Party as it is the only main party that is fighting for ordinary people. We don’t take corporate donations and I believe any party that does has a massive conflict of interest when it comes to deciding policy. My politics, and that of the party, are based on evidence, not lobbying and an unsustainable economic model – a world based on cooperation and democracy that would prioritise the many, not the few, and would not risk the planet’s future with environmental destruction and unsustainable consumption.

1. What do you plan to do in order to make sure you remain ‘in touch’ with the electorate?
I am an IT professional and am an active user of social media. I use my Twitter account, Facebook page and Web site to communicate with the electorate several times a day. This communication works both ways. I believe it is up to politicians not only to make their honestly held views public, but to make themselves available for questions. I always answer these promptly and honestly – I am working to make politics more responsive and open.

Of course, not everyone is comfortable with or able to use the Internet, so I also use traditional methods of communication – door-knocking/canvassing, public meetings and ‘meet and greets’ via street stalls. With a fraction of the financial resources available to the other parties we can’t afford dozens of glossy leaflets – talking directly to the electorate is even more vital.

2. What makes you the best candidate for this constituency?
I am an ordinary resident who simply wants to serve the constituency and the country, not a flown-in career politician. I have no plan to climb the greasy pole of power, so I will do what is best for my constituents without competing for future ministerial posts.

The Green Party is not whipped. This means that nobody will be able to force me to vote for something that I don’t believe is right. Whatever candidates for the main parties may say they believe, ultimately they most toe their party line. I will not have to.

I am the only candidate speaking for all residents, rich or poor. I have policies that the huge majority of the electorate support: keeping the NHS public, protecting the poor and disabled and renationalising power and rail. Other parties support deepening austerity and reduced taxes for the richest. I will fight for everyone else.

3. What has the current Member achieved that you believe has been successful?
As with nearly all Liberal Democrat MPs, Don Foster has propped-up one of the worst governments of the last fifty years. As Chief Whip he is compelled to vote with the government, including passing their appalling Health and Social Care Act resulting in the fragmentation and privatisation of our NHS.

He deserves some credit for voting to introduce equal marriage.

4. In your opinion, is austerity working? What should we take from the state of the economy during this Government’s tenure?
Austerity is clearly not working. While unemployment figures might indicate fewer people are looking for work, the real-terms pay of all but the very wealthiest people has decreased since 2010. A massive increase in ‘zero hours’ contracts and people forced to become self-employed contractors hides the real problem of underemployment and an increasing number of people unable to afford basics, including feeding themselves (as indicated by the huge increase in food bank use).

Wages people earn matter to economic growth. Sustained recovery is only possible if the middle and working classes have money to spend. Far from being a ‘success’, the push for austerity has resulted in the slowest economic recovery in 170 years. By every measure it has been a failure.

5. Does (legal) immigration need more limitations or is it vital for the UK?
The Green party would replace existing British Immigration law with an Immigration law which does not discriminate directly on the grounds of race, colour, religion, political belief, disability, sex or sexual orientation. This law will be based on the principle of fair and prompt treatment of applicants rather than on excluding dishonest applicants whatever the cost to the honest ones. It will not aim to allow increased net migration to Britain other than for humanitarian reasons or as a result of other Green Party policies. We will consult widely with affected groups to ensure that features of the current law which are of concern to them are addressed.

We will allow the partners, prospective partners, immediate families and prospective families of British residents to join them without excessive delays or unreasonable requirements for proof of relationship. This will be independent of the financial status of the resident and will not be dependent on her/him providing accommodation (We recognise that this must be implemented in association with a housing policy).

A person`s right to stay will not be linked to that of partners or families but will be independent. Families will not be divided by deportation unless the deportee poses a serious danger to public safety. We will abolish the primary purpose rule under which partners are refused entry if it is thought that the primary purpose of relationship is for them to gain entry to the UK.

We will allow the victims of past errors in immigration decisions to come to the UK where these decisions have resulted in continuing serious deprivation. Migrants illegally in the UK for over five years will be allowed to remain unless they pose a serious danger to public safety.

6. Many people are concerned with the cost of living in the UK, with wages having failed to rise in line with the price of food, energy and rent in recent years. How can this be corrected?
We would tackle the cost of living in a number of ways. Firstly we would reduce the costs – energy costs will be tackled by renationalising, cutting the huge profits being made from people’s bills. We would also renationalise rail, saving the country £1bn a year.

Rents would be reduced by the introduction of rent controls in the private housing sector, and the initiation of a major council house building programme.

Food costs will be tackled by a number of measures to substantially reduce waste – we all pay the costs of throwing a third of all food away. Sustainable production methods will also reduce the production cost of food.

Finally, we will tackle inadequate income. We will make the minimum wage a living wage and will increase it to £10 by 2020. Everyone will also receive a Citizens Income that will cover the basic costs of living. This will replace benefits and ensure that everyone will have somewhere to live and food on the table.

7. How would you like to see the NHS change in the future in order to become more successful?
Firstly, and most importantly, I would immediately reverse the slashing of funding, fragmentation and privatisation that the Coalition government has forced on our NHS. I would aim to increase spending on health to at least the European average.

An NHS Tax, earmarked to increase direct funding of the NHS, should be introduced as part of general income and other taxation.

I believe it is wrong in principle that private health care companies should be able to employ or use staff who have been expensively trained by the NHS without contributing something to the cost of that training. Therefore companies, including pharmaceutical companies, employing or using NHS-trained healthcare professionals outside the NHS should have to pay an additional training tax. The proceeds from this levy would go directly into the NHS Tax.

Market forces cannot allocate healthcare fairly, nor even efficiently. The NHS internal market has wasted badly needed resources on administration, and reduced efficiency and morale. The internal market should be wound up and replaced with clear financial and service accountability of decentralised service units to regional assemblies within a single corporate whole.

8. What measures do you think need to be taken to decrease unemployment, particularly youth unemployment and those who have never been employed?
The loss of jobs that has gone with mismanagement of an unsustainable economic model is a criminal waste of talent and aspiration, and has turned life into a daily struggle for survival for millions of our fellow citizens.

As top bankers continue to pocket money in the form of unearned bonuses, factories, firms and farms are forced to lay off more and more workers by the day. This must end. My major and immediate priority is the creation of an extra million jobs and training places within a full year of operation of our major investment plan, the Green New Deal. This would address both the employment and the environmental problems. It would consist of a package of measures, including workforce training, investment in renewables, public transport, insulation, social housing and waste management.

I do not support ‘Workfare’ measures. Many people forced onto Workfare schemes are made to quit their education, training or voluntary sector work in order to do jobs irrelevant to their careers for no pay, reducing their employability and taking a paid job that the company would otherwise have given to someone else.

9. Does the lack of diversity in Parliament equate to a lack of representation?
I am proud to be a member of the only UK-wide party that has had two female leaders, including our current leader. Our MP, peer, and two thirds of our MEPs are all female. This puts us well ahead of all other parliamentary parties.

However, we cannot rest on our laurels – we, and all other parties, are still mostly white. We need to work harder to make parliament more representative of the population by race as well as gender.

Parliament is not representative of the population, and this means that there is indeed a lack of representation. This is largely due to a general disillusion and disengagement with politics. It is vital that this is tackled, as an engagement with politics is the only permanent way to make parliament more representative. I support mandatory teaching of politics and society at all schools, and electoral reform so that every vote counts.

Unlike other parties, The Green Party is fully democratic. Any member can put themselves forward as a candidate for election, and they are chosen on a ‘one member one vote’ basis. This means that candidates generally reflect the social make-up of the area within which they are selected.

10 . If an EU Referendum were to take place, how would you encourage your constituents to vote and why?
The Green Party supports an ‘in/out’ EU referendum. I believe that the democratic approach is a detailed and thorough debate to the pros and cons of EU membership, then to let a properly informed electorate decide.

There are many problems with the EU as it stands. I recognise the value of the original goal of the founders of the European Communities, who sought to remove the threat of another war between European states. This has been distorted by vested political and economic interests into a union dominated by economic interests, which lacks democratic control, and promotes the goals of multinational corporations which are interested in profit not people, and which runs counter to the professed core values of the Union.

However, I believe that the ecological challenges and stark inequalities the world faces present a potential new role for the EU as part of wider global co-operation. Following the Green Party principle of subsidiarity, many issues currently decided at the EU level should be dealt with at a more appropriate level for effective action, which might be local, national or global, but there will always be a role for Europe-wide legislation. I would encourage my constituents to vote ‘yes’ and would work with our MEPs to reform the EU into a more appropriate organisation that will work for our benefit, rather than abandoning it and having to deal with its decisions anyway.

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