Back

Calder Valley

West Yorkshire constituency covering most of the upland metropolitan district of Calderdale.

The current representing MP is Craig Whittaker of the Conservative Party.

2010 General Election Results (Adjusted for non-voters)
Calder Valley

For more information, click here to visit the Wikipedia article.

Candidates

Rod Sutcliffe

Background
I was brought up in Halifax and worked as a GP in Yorkshire, mostly in Halifax and Hebden Bridge. I was very much involved in medical education, both in my practice and in The Faculty of Medicine at the University of Leeds. Since retiring I have been living a simpler life (until now!) fell running, walking, travelling, and reading and socialising. I have realised that our over-centralised state and excessive dominance of London has led to underdevelopment of the English regions and an unbalanced economy. Democracy is degraded inequality is increasing (not even most Londoners are benefitting). We need to continue on the path of devolution towards a federal Britain.

Yorkshire First is campaigning for a democratically elected parliament for Yorkshire similar to the Scottish parliament. The people of Scotland have given us a brilliantly shown us how to engage communities and regenerate politics. We can do this in Yorkshire. We can get the powers to make decisions in Yorkshire for the benefit of the people of Yorkshire. This will be Yorkshire’s example for democracy and economic development in the English regions. This is why I am running for Yorkshire First.

1. What do you plan to do in order to make sure you remain ‘in touch’ with the electorate?
Yorkshire First candidates agree to the Bell principles, a set of conduct guidelines for independent elected representatives ( www.independentnetwork.org.uk/resources/bell-principles ). One principle is that candidates will “listen, consulting our communities constantly and innovatively”. I live in the Calder Valley and if elected I will be there as much as I can. I will be available for contact by letter, email, media channels and regular surgeries, and will attend and organise local meetings on topics of concern. I will continually strive to be aware of and understand the concerns of people in the Calder Valley and to let them know what I am doing.
2. What makes you the best candidate for this constituency?
Yorkshire First stands for democracy, social justice, reducing inequality, and integrity in politics. We are a party of independents. Following the Bell Principles I will be guided by considered evidence, my real world experience and expertise, my constituency and my conscience. I will be free from the control of a political party. In Yorkshire First there are no party lines and no party whips. I will say what I think and do what I believe is right and best for my constituents and community. This is why I am the best candidate for Calder Valley.
3. What has the current Member achieved that you believe has been successful?
I do not know.
4. In your opinion, is austerity working? What should we take from the state of the economy during this Government’s tenure?
As I understand it the government’s aims for the austerity programme were to abolish the national deficit within the current parliament (stated aim), reduce the size of the state and reduce taxation (unstated aims). It has failed to abolish the deficit, it has reduced the size of state a little through stringent cuts and has reduced tax collection by accident through depressing wages. A mixed result.

For me the aim of economic policy should be to accelerate recovery from the recession. It took me some time to understand that managing a national economy is not like household budgeting. At home, if debt is building up and income falling, you need to cut spending. At national level, increasing government spending, especially on infrastructure such as housing and transport, stimulates an economy and is the fastest way to recover from a recession. Dramatic cutting of government spending depresses the economy and prolongs a recession by reducing people’s spending power and the government’s tax income. This is exactly what has happened over the last five years. Reducing deficit and national debt is desirable but not necessary, and certainly not urgent in our case. Austerity is not working.

5. Does (legal) immigration need more limitations or is it vital for the UK?
Immigration is good for our country. Over thousands of years it has contributed to the rich culture we enjoy. International students, for instance, contribute to the economy and our future skills base and workforce. Immigrant workers on average claim less in benefits than the indigenous population, pay tax, and provide much needed labour. They are not the cause of low wages – government policy is. The two-way flow within the European Union is a basic principle of the single market that supports the whole European economy. There are no sensible grounds for limiting immigration, it just needs to be managed well.
6. Many people are concerned about the cost of living in the UK, with wages having failed to rise in line with the price of food, energy and rent in recent years. How can this be corrected?
The economies of the regions of England have been allowed to decline. In Yorkshire we have great potential to develop our economy, provide more and better jobs and implement a living wage. A Yorkshire parliament will have the powers and incentive to do this. Nationally we should abandon the austerity policy and stimulate the economy by a programme of housebuilding, transport infrastructure development, etc. Reducing tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance is an absolute priority. A recent analysis showed that abolishing these would remove any question of a “need” for austerity.
7. How would you like to see the NHS change in the future in order to become more successful?
The NHS is far too big for central national policy to work for all areas. We need regional policy and planning. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland already have the powers to do this. We need a health service for Yorkshire, with health policies for Yorkshire, more responsive to local needs and wishes. Privatisation of services has not improved quality or reduced costs. The profit motive destroys our caring NHS ethos. We need public provision as well as public funding. International evidence shows that countries that have comprehensive primary health care as the basis of their health service have better health at a lower cost than those that are centrally based on hospital services. There will always be enormous pressures on our health services and every £1 spent on primary care is worth £3 spent on secondary care. We need to change the emphasis to real investment in public health, and publicly provided general practice, primary care and social care. This will enable us to manage pressures on hospital services whilst controlling costs and improving health in the longer term.
8. What measures do you think need to be taken to decrease unemployment, particularly youth unemployment and those who have never been employed?
I would advocate a policy of full employment and certainly this should be so in a Yorkshire parliament. With the right focus a regional approach can go a long way towards this. Yorkshire First is calling for a ‘Yorkshire Challenge’ for education. A rapidly changing world means that a real focus on skills and future industries is critical to providing the jobs needed for a brighter future. With a dynamic approach, education, private industry and the public sector working together, we can equip the region for future success. How can this be done? I cannot do better than the University and College Union’s Fifteen Big Ideas manifesto ( http://www.ucu.org.uk/ge15manifesto ). Some of the ideas are listed below.
• Commit to increased public spending on the knowledge economy.
• Redesign the way in which post-school education is funded.
• Reinforce the importance of early years education as a determinant of life chances.
• Ensure a real choice and balance between academic and vocational options for 14-19 year olds.
• Overhaul careers education to improve understanding of different educational pathways.
• Enhance the apprenticeship brand by improving quality and ensuring that apprentices receive a rounded education.
• Tackle youth unemployment using a kite-marked partnership model for local authorities, businesses and education providers.
• Introduce greater incentives for collaboration between schools, colleges, universities and community learning programmes to widen participation.
• Launch a bespoke educational offer for those aged 25 and over wishing to up-skill and retrain.
• Undertake an in-depth review of the prison education system.
9. Does the lack of diversity in Parliament equate to a lack of representation?
Not necessarily, though in practice, yes. It is possible to be a good representative of groups and communities that you are different from (and all individual MPs have to do this), though I believe that more diversity across parliament as a whole would lead to better representation of the the views of most groups, and just as importantly, to better governance overall. Parliament would make better decisions if more women were involved, if more people from a range of different backgrounds were part of it and if more people with life experiences and expertise from areas outside politics were able to contribute. A Yorkshire parliament could be designed to encourage more diversity in terms of gender, cultural background and life experience.
10 . If an EU Referendum were to take place, how would you encourage your constituents to vote and why?
We should vote to stay in, without a doubt. Britain’s future is definitely in Europe, and Britain needs to be a leader in the European Union, not whinging from the fringes. The EU can be a force for good in the world and Britain has much to contribute in Europe and in the world through the EU. We also have much to gain from membership. It costs us very little, some of this we get back through grants and much more through trade. We can exert influence internationally through the EU. Most countries agree that the EU needs reforms, and the best way to achieve these is to be fully engaged and use our influence in a positive and constructive way. The EU already recognises Yorkshire as a region and as a constituency, and promotes the principle of subsidiarity, unlike the UK government.

Paul Rogan

1. What do you plan to do in order to make sure you remain ‘in touch’ with the electorate?
Continue to live in Stainland and keep in touch with electors like I learned how to do when Councillor for Rastrick ward.
2. What makes you the best candidate for this constituency?
I am old, have got all the T shirts going but have a 15 year old son who keeps me in touch with the young, our future.
3. What has the current Member achieved that you believe has been successful?
Kept Labour and their disastrous policies away over the last 5 years.
4. In your opinion, is austerity working? What should we take from the state of the economy during this Government’s tenure?
Cuts, the old word for ‘ difficult choices’ are never going to be easy. Do we want to end up like Greece having to go cap in hand to other countries?
5. Does (legal) immigration need more limitations or is it vital for the UK?
Immigration is good but has to be properly monitored and encouraged only in the best interests of the UK. The UK should not be the free ‘Disney Land’ and soft touch of the world.
6. Many people are concerned about the cost of living in the UK, with wages having failed to rise in line with the price of food, energy and rent in recent years. How can this be corrected?
By limiting immigration and cheap labour as previous question.
7. How would you like to see the NHS change in the future in order to become more successful?
I do not think the question of the NHS should become a political football. The NHS should become an apolitical matter. That will the most healthy change we could give our NHS.
8. What measures do you think need to be taken to decrease unemployment, particularly youth unemployment and those who have never been employed?
Better training, better schools, elevating technical and engineering qualifications to the same levels as academic ones. Focusing on talents rather than forcing young people into a ‘comprehensive’ pool which is failing too many. There is LOTS to do; more than I can write here in a few words.
9. Does the lack of diversity in Parliament equate to a lack of representation?
No more than a 2nd House which is un-elected and a voting system which is Neanderthal.
10 . If an EU Referendum were to take place, how would you encourage your constituents to vote and why?
Not to be afraid of a life outside of the EU. Is New Zealand, only a very small country, a non entity in a world outside of the EU? I think NOT!

Privacy Policy [X]

This privacy policy sets out how Candidate Hub uses and protects any information that you give Candidate Hub when you use this website. Candidate Hub is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement.

We may change this policy from time to time by updating this page. You should check this page from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes. This policy is effective from 26/08/2014.

Who we are:

We are a new site for 2015 aiming to revolutionise the way people in Britain vote in General Elections.

How we collect information:

We collect information such as your name and email address if you send us a message via the contact form on our website.

We also collect data using Google Analytics:

Google Analytics is a web analysis service provided by Google. Google utilizes the data collected to track and examine the use of www.candidatehub.co.uk, to prepare reports on its activities and share them with other Google services.

Google may use the data collected to contextualize and personalize the ads of its own advertising network.

Personal data collected: Cookie and Usage Data. Find Google's privacy policy here.

What we do with the information that we collect:

  • Internal record keeping.

Cookies:

Candidate Hub use cookies to enhance your experience. Cookies are very small text files that are stored on your computer when you visit some websites.

You can disable any cookies already stored on your computer, but these may stop our website from functioning properly.

For more detailed information about cookies please visit a cookie information website such as allaboutcookies.org or aboutcookies.org

The following are not Strictly Necessary, but are required to provide you with the best user experience and also to tell us which pages you find most interesting (anonymously).

Please note that we treat usage of our website as acceptance of cookies. You are free to block them but if you do so then we cannot guarantee that our website will be fully functional.

First Party Cookies:

The following cookie is set by Candidate Hub to remember whether or not you have read and dismissed the 'cookie acknowledgement' on this website. This cookies is set to expire 365 days after it is set, ensuring the cookie acknowledgment isn't shown to you again for at least 365 days after you have dismissed it. This cookie does not store or collect any personal information.

  • ch_ca - expires in 365 days

For information on how to manage and block individual cookies please visit aboutcookies.org.

Performance Cookies:

This website will track the pages that you visit via Google Analytics. The following cookies are used by Google Analytics to do so:

  • __utma
  • __utmb
  • __utmc
  • __utmv
  • __utmz

For further information on the above mentioned Google Analytics cookies, please visit developers.google.com/analytics/resources/concepts/gaConceptsCookies

Google provide a browser plugin for all major browsers which enables opting out of the Google Analytics service. To download the plugin and opt out of the Google Analytics service click here.

Functionality Cookies:

This website will allow you to share pages with social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Google+

The following cookies are issued by Twitter via the 'Tweet' button. Candidate Hub does not have access to, or use the data collected by these cookies.

  • guest_id

View the Twitter Privacy Policy for more information on cookies set by Twitter.

The following cookies are issued by Facebook via the Facebook 'Share' button. Candidate Hub does not have access to, or use the data collected by these cookies.

  • act
  • csm
  • datr
  • fr
  • lu
  • wd
  • c_user
  • s
  • xs

For information on how Facebook uses cookies please see facebook.com/help/360595310676682.

The following cookies are issued by Google via the '+1' button. Candidate Hub does not have access to, or use the data collected by these cookies.

  • NID
  • PREF
  • GAPS

View the Google Privacy Policy for more information on cookies set by Google.

For information on how to manage and block individual cookies please visit aboutcookies.org.

Links to other websites:

Our website contains links to other websites. By using these links you will leave our website. Please note that we do not have any control over external websites and so we cannot be responsible for the protection and privacy of any information which you provide whilst visiting any external website that we link to. The external websites that we link to are not governed by this privacy statement. Please exercise caution when viewing external websites and be sure to view the privacy statement that is applicable to the website.

← Return to Candiate Hub

Announcement:

The 2015 election is now over. All information is regarding the 2015 General Election unless otherwise stated. More news to come. Follow us on Twitter to keep up to date: @Candidate_Hub

Dismiss [X]