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Newport East

Newport East is located in the south of Wales. The seat was created in its current form in 1983 and has been held by Labour ever since.

The current member of parliament is Labour’s Jessica Morden, who has served since 2005.

2010 General Election Results (Adjusted for non-voters)
Newport East

For more information, click here to visit the Wikipedia article.

Candidates

David Mclean

1. What do you plan to do in order to make sure you remain ‘in touch’ with the electorate?
Newport is a very diverse place, and reaching all communities is a challenge for this reason. Many people are online, but equally, many older people aren’t. So the solution is to take a broad approach to reaching people, which includes engaging in public events, engagement through the local media, meeting people on the street and on the doorstep, and of course making sure those who are online have access to as much information as possible. But ‘remaining in touch’ means more than simply communication. It means understanding the issues that are of most concern to the people of Newport.
2. What makes you the best candidate for this constituency?
I am not a career politician. I have decided to stand (actually, I’ve been encouraged to stand by many people) because I am driven by a passion to do what I can to defend Newport, and to push for the all-important change needed to put the city back onto the road to prosperity. And that means primarily a focus on LOCAL independently owned business that provides genuine job and career opportunities. The Conservatives, Labour and Liberal Democrats have done Newport no favours and have handed over our futures to multinational corporations that only take, take, take, but give very little in return. Newport is a great city with great people, but we have been betrayed by successive governments, which is why we now have such low levels of private sector business and jobs growth, and such high levels of Job Seekers Allowance claimants. The time has come for Newport to say ‘no more’. The time has come to fight for a stronger and more sustainable city – sustainable local businesses, sustainable local jobs, and sustainable environment.
3. What has the current Member achieved that you believe has been successful?
I have no personal agenda about either Jessica Morden or Paul Flynn, indeed, as an ex-Labour voter I have always put my tick next to Paul Flynn’s name. But I no longer feel the Labour party best represents me or the city. However, I have been impressed by Jessica Morden’s work regarding the Severn Bridge tolls, and she should be commended for her efforts.
4. In your opinion, is austerity working? What should we take from the state of the economy during this Government’s tenure?
No, austerity certainly isn’t working, for the simple reason that it is storing up future problems that will cost far more to address than any money saved through the austerity programme. If we want illustration of how austerity (and the Conservative/LibDem coalition) is failing the UK we need only to consider that food banks are now increasingly commonplace. That we are even talking about food banks in 2015 when we are the world’s 6th richest nation shows just how far British society has become skewed, is unfair, and works against the poorest in society.
5. Does (legal) immigration need more limitations or is it vital for the UK?
Immigration remains a subject about which people are very passionate. However, a lot of scaremongering and a culture of ‘blame everything on immigration’ clouds the reality that immigrants from the 10 countries that joined the EU in 2004 have added nearly £5bn more in taxes than they take out in public services (according to research by the University College London). Immigrants who arrived since 2000 are 43% less likely to receive state benefits or tax credits, and 7% less likely to live in social housing. But of course we DO need to keep the debate about immigration going, however, it needs to be conducted from a position of pragmatism and not from inaccurate kneejerk scaremongering.
6. Many people are concerned about the cost of living in the UK, with wages having failed to rise in line with the price of food, energy and rent in recent years. How can this be corrected?
The solution is for the UK to become far more self-sufficient. Successive government budgets merely tinker, and usually serve only to bribe people with small crumbs-off-the-table handouts that do not address the core issue. Too many people are living on low wages, with no career prospects, while others haven’t seen a decent wage rise in a long time. The UK has become too reliant on imports, including energy and food. But if we were to become more self-sufficient we would not only become better protected against global price rises, but we would export more and generate more revenue IN to the country. If we are bringing wealth in to the country, and are more self-sufficient, we would all be better off.
7. How would you like to see the NHS change in the future in order to become more successful?
The NHS needs to be returned back to basics. We all have a romantic vision of the NHS back when ‘it worked’, with a stern but fair matron keeping a tight hold of cleanliness and standards, and well-rewarded doctors, surgeons and dentists delivering the very highest service. A return to that IS achievable, but it needs the cold hand of commercialism to be pulled away from the throat of the NHS. Successive tampering, reductions in funding, and creeping privatisation are working against the NHS, but STILL it remains the best health service in the world. In June 2014, a report by the Commonwealth Fund, a Washington-based foundation respected around the world for its analysis of the performance of different countries’ health systems, concluded that the NHS is the best healthcare system in the world. In their report they said, “The United Kingdom ranks first overall, scoring highest on quality, access and efficiency.” Of the 11 health systems measured, including the United States, the NHS spends the second-lowest amount on healthcare – just £2,008 per head. This is less than half what the USA spends (£5,017) and only New Zealand spends less (£1,876). Such a valuable asset is clearly burning a hole in the government’s pocket and they are desperate to sell it off. But if we can depoliticise the NHS, fund it properly, and stop meddling, it could return to the service we all know it could, and should be.
8. What measures do you think need to be taken to decrease unemployment, particularly youth unemployment and those who have never been employed?
Firstly, we need more locally owned local businesses that offer decent employment, interesting work, and genuine career prospects, and crucially where young people feel valued and important to the business. Young people are generally disincentivised by minimum wage, zero hour jobs offered by multinational corporations where they feel anything but valued, and they see no career path. We also need to look at the high-growth, high value industries which will become the future for Wales if the Welsh government can recognise their value. Newport is perfect as a potential centre for IT excellence and cyber-security, and I was hugely impressed by the original vision set out by the reNewport project. However, a vision needs support to become a reality, and I don’t believe the original reNewport vision has that support (Council Leader Bob Bright famously said “We could all have written down those ideas.”). Other industries we should nurture include the renewable energy industry, which could benefit from the strong gene of engineering excellence that is within Newport. This industry employs over 11,000 people in Scotland with high-value jobs. Wales is perfectly placed to take similar advantage of the global growth industry and Newport should be at the heart of it.
9. Does the lack of diversity in Parliament equate to a lack of representation?
Perhaps the question should be, does the lack of diversity in Parliament effect voter turnout? Because clearly it does. The British political system needs a fundamental overhaul and it is no longer fit-for-purpose in the 21st Century. First-past-the-post is unrepresentative and people feel their vote does not really count. The voting age needs to be lowered to 16 because ultimately, young people have most to lose and they need to be engaged. These are just two of the reasons we see a lack of diversity in Parliament. But with a fundamental overhaul we would see a natural evolution towards a more representative system, where more people consider rolling up their sleeves and getting involved. You can’t force people to get involved, and I don’t personally agree with weighted shortlists. People need to see the value of engagement in politics, but Parliament appears to be structured with the intention of discouraging engagement.
10 . If an EU Referendum were to take place, how would you encourage your constituents to vote and why?
Europe is hugely important to the UK and Wales. We all recognise its value as the main market for our industries. But we also need to consistently re-evaluate our relationship and the terms of that relationship. Leaving the EU would decimate our industries and lead to countless industry closures and job losses – for example, why would a major American employer that has a European operation based in the UK, remain in the UK if the UK left the EU and they suddenly have to deal with the red-tape of genuine ‘export’? They would simply relocate into Europe and we would become merely a small island market that is less important. We need to stay in the EU for this reason, but we need to use our influence and strength to keep reforming the EU for the better.

Natasha Asghar

1. What do you plan to do in order to make sure you remain ‘in touch’ with the electorate?
I think it’s vital to stay in touch with the constituents, so not only will I be going door to door, but equally spending time on getting the youth of Newport East involved and interested in politics, by going to Q&A sessions, career day talks and even pre- election debates. Only once you speak to them and develop their understanding, will they get involved and you never know one may even be the future PM?
2. What makes you the best candidate for this constituency?
I was born and raised in Newport, then educated locally. However after I moved away for University and travelled the world. I came back and even now I am not happy with the state of Newport. People are not motivated, there are not great job opportunities, tourism is dire, local residents have not benefitted from events such as the Ryder Cup,NATO etc etc. I believe in being the change I wish to see in the world and hopefully my vision and experience will be an asset into making Newport East prosperous in many ways.
3. What has the current Member achieved that you believe has been successful?
You can look at Jessica Morden’s successes on her Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessica_Morden
4. In your opinion, is austerity working? What should we take from the state of the economy during this Government’s tenure?
Growth figures have been revised up again, with the economy expected to expand by 2.5 per cent this year, up from 2.4 per cent forecast in December. Next year it will be 2.3 per cent, up from 2.2 per cent previously expected. As a result, this year national debt will start falling as a share of national income, as the Coalition promised in 2010.
Only today the Chancellor announced the following:
· Growth this year to be 2.5%, up from 2.4% forecast in December
· Borrowing falling each year to reach a surplus of £7billion by 2019-20
· Amount workers can earn before paying tax to rise to £11,000 by 2017
· Savers will also be promised a tax cut after years of low interest rates
· Pensioners to be able to turn their retirement funds into a cash lump sum
· New tax raids on banks and large pension pots expected to be announced
· £1billion tidal lagoon plan to harness the power of the sea off south Wales
· An extra £1.25billion to help 3 in 10 children with mental health problems
5. Does (legal) immigration need more limitations or is it vital for the UK?
Immigration is a very sensitive subject, it is very hard to put limits on the amount of people coming into the UK. However I do believe that the criteria for people coming into the UK needs to be toughened and the benefits and facilities available need to be re-evaluated depending on the case.
6. Many people are concerned about the cost of living in the UK, with wages having failed to rise in line with the price of food, energy and rent in recent years. How can this be corrected?
Living costs have been high however after the budget was announced only today Chancellor George Osboune as stated Families to be £900 better off this year than in 2010, He has not only cancelled the fuel duty hike that was expected, but he and the Conservative government have been doing everything to can to ensure that families are better off.
7. How would you like to see the NHS change in the future in order to become more successful?
In relation to Wales and my constituency in particular I would like more services to be provided to those people suffering from addictions and mental illnesses. This is because I feel many of the cases are linked to crimes,suicides and often neglect (not by Doctors) but by waiting lists and inundated facilities. Also I would to see cancer drugs readily available for those people who need it the most around Wales.
8. What measures do you think need to be taken to decrease unemployment, particularly youth unemployment and those who have never been employed?
The Conservatives have created 2 million apprenticeships, giving young people the start in life they need to secure a better future. The plan has been to Create 3 million apprenticeships by the end of the next Parliament – so young people can learn a trade and reach their full potential. Many people leave School and get stuck. The Conservatives not only are encouraging more people to get off benefits and into employment, they are backing their pledge by forming more jobs and providing funding for those who are budding entrepeneurs and offering learning and support programmes to help them get into paid employment. The Conservatives are also rolling out new ‘degree apprenticeships’ – so young people can earn a degree while training on the job. Degree apprenticeships are designed by businesses, universities and colleges, and combine the academic study of a degree with the practical experience of a highly-skilled job.
9. Does the lack of diversity in Parliament equate to a lack of representation?
100% yes. Fact: There are currently 650 total members of parliament in the
UK. Only 148 are women. Of those 148 women, only 6 are Asian.But what is the reason for this poor representation – is it that politics is simply a sexist and racist space that no-one in their right
minds wants to step into? Or are we as a community simply satisfied to complain that we don’t have representation, but too lazy
to actually do anything about it?Well that’s all about to change as a bold young woman I plan on picking the
gauntlet with the hope of becoming no 7 on the list of Asian women taking a stand.
10 . If an EU Referendum were to take place, how would you encourage your constituents to vote and why?
I would be sure to publicise the referendum thorough social media, make people aware through various face to face campaigns and make it clear through print media. In order to have your voice heard and opinion counted, one should take an interest and get involved in the referendum.

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